Thursday, February 3, 2011

Where's Snowzilla?



The warnings began late last week. A winter storm of "historic" proportions was headed our way. (They actually used the word "historic.") Comparisons were made to the blizzard of 1982 and the ice storm of 2006. We would be facing a state of emergency, newscasters warned repeatedly. Over a foot of snow was expected over a layer of ice. The entire bi-state area would be crippled for days, maybe longer, they said. Ameren called in crews from other states in anticipation of massive power outages. The Department of Transportation crews prepared to chemically treat the interstates and highways. News conferences were held to warn us to stay in our homes.

Which we did. Happily. 

The morning the storm arrived, all the local news programs went on the air early to cover this major weather event--and they stayed on most of the day, repeating, for the most part, the same information over and over. They didn't seem to notice that the blizzard they predicted never quite materialized. We got snow, yes We got enough ice to shut down schools and businesses, but no blizzard. But no Snowzilla.




(Looks like the folks on the East Coast are about as happy as we are.)


Newscasters and meteorologists tend to go overboard in their coverage of severe weather. They push all of the panic buttons simultaneously. My favorite drive-time radio gang, Phillips & Company at Y98, on the other hand, treated it with their trademark good humor, with talk of overnight bags and being stuck at the station.

At our house, everything, including the weather, is treated with equal irreverence. Tuesday evening, Collin and I watched The Day After Tomorrow and had French vanilla ice cream. Just so we could see the storm we missed. 

The Blizzard of 1982 sneaked up on us. The Blizzard of 2011 seems to have sneaked away.

11 comments:

  1. Funny blog, Norma! And a fitting movie to watch for Snowmageddon, or Snowpocalypse, or Snowzilla, or, well, a few flakes falling outside.

    Meteorologists for the most part are a cowardly, overacting lot. Every storm seems to be THE BIG ONE! OH MY GOD WE'RE ALL GONNA DIE!!! in their way of thinking....

    I was reading a columnist today who used the term weather porn to relate to all news stations who blow things way out of proportion on storms.

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  2. You mean this one?

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/arts/television/john-doyle/stop-the-weather-porn-insanity/article1892140/

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  3. Love the weather map. The Day after Tomorrow? Really? That's pretty ballsy.

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  4. Right after 9/11, when everyone else was watching comedies--we watched Armageddon, Deep Impact, Independence Day...movies that reminded us that the good guys do win.

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  5. I love the weather map!!!

    Because of all the "blizzard" warnings, the GTA (Greater Toronto Area), cancelled all the school buses, closed most of the schools and even the colleges and universities closed. I drove home from work in a snow storm, but it wasn't as bad as I had originally thought. I expected mostly snow-covered roads...not just a bit of blowing snow...I didn't like spending 2 hours shovelling though...

    However, Jamie got to have a snow-day with Grandpa and that made him happier than a pig in shit...

    BTW, love the movie 'The day after tomorrow'...(and Dennis...)

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  6. I love the first picture, since I have a post titled "Praying For Snow". Yikes.

    When I get down I watch "Love Actually".

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  7. Historically funny!!

    But this trend is sad too. The whimpification of society keeps growing stronger. Soon we will do nothing at all because there is a chance, just a chance that something unpleasant may occur.

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  8. Fun post! We also prepared ourselves for ice up to an inch thick, but only awoke to a glazing. May all the rest of the coming storms sneak away as well!

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  9. Love the post, Norma! I have somewhat of a different story coming from Wisconsin. We did get the blizzard and were buried with 25 inches of snow and the wind was something I've never seen before. It was truly amazing to watch. Now we sit in our cars at stoplights next to "snow walls" on the medians, turning corners in hopes there is no car coming because we cannot see beyond the 8-10ft mounds blocking our view. Thankfully it's over, and I did get a day off work from it.

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  10. Hilarious! Love the pics too. :)
    We got about 8 inches, and I did hear thunder around 2 a.m. amid the snowstorm, but snowmageddon it was not. Although I can't be too smug--Wednesday was my scheduled day off, so I didn't have to drive in it.

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