Wednesday, August 17, 2011

What Dreams May Come

No, this is not a review of the 1998 movie.

It's been said that God sometimes uses dreams to communicate with us. Psychiatrists say dreams are a window to our subconscious. Some are frightening; others are just plain silly. Some of us remember everything we dream, while others remember very little.


My good friend WMD partner and fellow author Mike Saxton has credited lucid dreams for the development of his 7 Scorpions series. I've developed parts of my own novels through dreams--for example, Alex's Images of Hell series of paintings in An Army of Angels came from my own nightmares.
I've seen Sam in my dreams in the six months he's been gone. I dream frequently of my parents, dreams that seem as if they're still here. I suppose a psychiatrist would tell me I have some unresolved subconscious issues with them. I think it just means I miss them. A lot.


After my maternal grandfather passed away, my mother and her brother and sister were searching his house for some important legal documents. They hadn't been able to find the documents--until one day, Mom received a phone call from a friend she hadn't seen in years. Gloria told Mom she'd had a dream about Grandpa, and she didn't know what to make of it. In the dream, he gave her a message to give Mom.
It turned out to be the location of the missing documents.


Coincidence? I don't think so.

My own dad saw his own death in a dream that haunted him for the last three months of his life. He described it to us in great detail...and it happened, exactly as he'd seen it in the dream.
I wonder.... 


13 comments:

  1. I often think that dreams are our minds' way of letting loose and running wild and free while the body's asleep.

    It is spooky though... finding documents because of a dream.

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  2. That's the spooky part. It was exactly where she told Mom to look.

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  3. I've always believed dreams are a portal from the Other Side. I think some dreams are our subconcious. It's figuring out the difference that's tough. I dreamed the cover to my poetry book.

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  4. The Connor character in Chasing the Wind came to me in a dream, too.

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  5. That's pretty cool! Dreams are very helpful (and annoying) for working through issues. I have loads of obnoxiously vivid dreams every night. It's exhausting! And I always have weather dreams. Like, for months I had a dream about three tornados hitting Maryland. Finally it really happened, three tornados at once, so the dream stopped. In San Antonio, I had a woman call me and tell her her name, and the electricity went out in the city. A few weeks later a hurricane (that was named by the woman who called me in my dream) hit the city and caused a black out. Then in El Paso (the desert) I had a dream right before we moved there about it flooding there. I woke up and said, "That's silly. It hardly rains there." A few weeks after we arrived, it started raining and didn't stop for weeks. It was an all-time record rain and cause major floods in the city! Well, I'm going back to the my psyche ward now! Though I'll admit, it comes in handy whenever I can't find my keys.

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  6. I'm not much of a "dreamer" per se, as in, I don't usually remember my dreams. However, I do get some of my material to write about through my "daydreams" I guess...even though this may occur at night. I think of something, and if I don't write it down, it will plague my sleep (or in most cases, prevent me from getting to sleep). If I write it down, it goes away. Funny how dreams work though...sometimes they give us the answers we're too blind to see.

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  7. I'm of the camp that believes dreams are both mental stress relief valves AND important tools for allowing our psyche to process complex emotional happenings in a safe environment.

    Can't tell you how many times in my life I've woken to a wet pillow from weeping in my dreams because I've lost someone important to me (in the dream). Probably my way of pouring out what my subconscious knows: that person means everything to me, and I consciously couldn't prepare myself to be without them. Probably wouldn't be healthy for me to go around bawling all day for fear of losing someone I love. Just my thoughts ... Great, evocative, post!

    EJ

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  8. It's an old story. Joseph rose in Pharoah's favor because he could read dreams. I haven't had anything our of the ordinary, but I'd like to think that dreams are more than just our subconscious in overdrive.

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  9. I don't believe in coincidence and I know that dreams hold far more meaning than science can label.

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  10. Dreams are a very real part of my life and so I could relate to your post in a personal way. I tend to have a mix of many contributing factors you mentioned: divine messages, emotional and mental processing, pizza for dinner. Great post!

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  11. I've had several dreams that have delivered messages to me. They say it's the way the other side communicates with us b/c in our sleep we're open to the other world.

    In Secondhand Shoes, Lila has dreams that warn her.

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  12. I thought I made a comment here two days ago and I hope I didn't say something that got deleted. Love the idea of dreams--my manuscript deals with dreams, but I try to avoid writing about nightmares! Your poor dad--that was a nightmare!

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  13. Dreams are products of the subconscious - they are sometimes 'overflow', allowing the mind to process, use or get rid of various acquired concerns. We can face in sleep what we are reluctant to pursue awake. If we remember them, dreams can be indicators of what our mind processes for us when we are most reluctant to confront when we are conscious. To some people, most conscious means most fearful... so dreams are a useful escape valve. We can learn from that.

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